Matt Hoy


  • Name: MATT HOY
  • Date of Birth: 2/21/1971
  • Hometown: Newcastle, Australia

  • Matt Hoy lives live to the fullest. It’s the only way he knows how. A true original, the Australian surfs like rock n roll sounds. Fast, loud, energized, purposeful! He built a reputation as one of the rawest individuals in the history of surfing, and found competitive success while he was at it. He won three World Tour events in his career and finished 5th in the world in 1997. It’s safe to say that Hoy probably had more fun than anyone else in his era, enjoying everything opportunity that came his way. These days, Hoy’s got a family and kids and still enjoys life to the max. And of course, he’s still surfing with that classic rock n roll style.

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We’re all getting older. You know it. We know it. Stevie Nicks knows it. That’s just the nature of time, baby.


As bones begin to rot, joints start nagging and skin gets weathered, there are different theories on how to age well and keep ripping into the later decades of your life. Some stretch all day. Eat healthy. Go to bed at 10, wake up at 6. You know the drill.


Then there’s Matt Hoy.


Hoy’s made a career out of living fast. He was once ranked Top 5 in the World and indulged in all of the extra-circular activities available to a professional surfer along the way. Oh, weren’t the 1990s special?


Here’s a quick clip of Hoy, who is soon to be 47, going HAM on a recent trip to the Mentawai Islands. Maybe the secret aging well is living like Hoy.


Well, there’s only one way to find out.


Clip by @isaacjones_


Long live HOY




In a fitting climax to the Quiksilver and Coca-Cola Amatil sponsored Bali Big Eco Weekend, Bali legend Made Switra barreled his way to victory and celebrated his win at Single Fin as the sun set on a day of epic waves. The event brought tourists, local surf community members and legendary local and international surfers together to surf Uluwatu in order to highlight its beauty and the need to continue to improve the environmental welfare of Bali.


For his win, Switra had the honor of adding his name to the perpetual Quiksilver Uluwatu Challenge trophy and having it presented to him at Single Fin by none other than 4-time World Champion Mark Richards and Simon Anderson, the inventor of the thruster surfboard.


Switra shared, “I didn’t think about winning the contest today, I just wanted to enjoy good waves with good friends and have some fun. I was winning already when I paddled out but it’s great to be the chosen winner of this event and I want to say thanks to God, thanks to the Ulu boys and to all the legends that joined in as well.



For just Rp2 million ($150 USD) entry fee, the lucky 40+ surfers paddled out in perfect 4-5ft Uluwatu to compete with Quiksilver legends including Mark Richards, Matt Hoy, Tom Carroll, and Simon Anderson. Joining the international legends were Bali legends that included Ketut Menda, Made Switra, Made Lana, Tipi Jabrik, Dede Suryana and Rizal Tanjung as well first time international competitors Dylan Longbottom, Ozzie Wright and professional snowboarder Matt Crepel for a total of 54 participants. This year’s Quiksilver Uluwatu Challenge was run in the Eddie Aikau 6-person heat format where each surfer competes in two 30-minute heats and their two highest scores from their four best waves were then scored and totaled. Switra was the surfer with the highest two-wave score total of 17.5 (out of a possible 20 points) with a 9.0 (out of a possible 10 points) in Heat 1, and then an 8.5 in Heat 2, both being deep Racetrack barrels.


The 5th annual Quiksilver Uluwatu Challenge this year was a fundraiser by Quiksilver and Coca-Cola Amatil Indonesia for the Uluwatu based NGO, Project Clean Uluwatu (PCU), to raise money that will go towards new infrastructure programs at Uluwatu that will keep the world-class wave clean and pristine for generations to come. Bringing world-renowned surfing legends to Bali helps to draw attention to the challenges it faces with accelerating tourism growth.


4-time World Champion Mark Richards (AUS) didn’t get to surf in the competition this year due to a back injury, but counts this as one of the most enjoyable and important events he attends each year, saying “Bali is being loved to death by tourism, so it is under an incredible amount of environmental stress, so I think it’s important that anyone that is trying to make a difference is supported, because we need to preserve the beauty and uniqueness of this place for future generations.”


Richards added, “I know there are a lot of people that still long for the old days where there was just a couple warungs here at Uluwatu and you walked in over the fields, but unfortunately that’s not the reality of life…when you find something special, it’s impossible to just keep it for yourself, and I guess Bali is the classic case of where people from all nations come and want to enjoy this place, not just for surfing but the culture and just general tourism as well, so its vital that each of us, to whatever level we can, do our part to preserve Bali for the future.”


2-time World Champion Tom Carroll (AUS) recently underwent a complete knee replacement so was unable to surf with a conventional surfboard, but not to be denied Carroll gamely swam out on a surf mat to take on the 4-6 foot Uluwatu barrels. When asked about his adventure out in the Uluwatu lineup he replied, “Even though I couldn’t stand up on a board, I knew I had to go out and have a go! I figured it is also really good rehab for my knee by activating the muscles… I’ve been doing some training in the pool with little trainer fins but it was a different story getting flogged by those sets out there today… it was great fun!”


Regarding the event itself, Carroll said, “It is so great to see all the positive energy around this event…engaging the locals, local businesses, and the government, Coca Cola Amatil and Quiksilver have built an amazing CSR program that shows what industry can do to have a positive impact in the areas it conducts business. With the Indonesian government planning to increase tourism numbers to Bali there will be even more ecological pressure on the environment, so it’s going to be even more important to be in the forefront, keeping the flame alive and keeping up the visibility, which is the aim of the annual Bali Big Eco Weekend and Uluwatu Challenge. I can’t wait to come back next year when I’ll be back on my surfboard and getting barreled again at Uluwatu with the boys!”


Former world tour surfer, Matt Hoy, also carried an injury into the event having hurt it in the recent swell that lashed the Australian east cost, but as with Carroll, it wasn’t enough to stop him from surfing perfect Uluwatu with only a few other guys saying “As I grow older the friendships I have made through 30 years of professional surfing become the most important thing to me and to be able to share in the Bali Big Eco Weekend with Indonesian and International friends and highlight the importance of keeping our oceans clean is an event I pencil into my calendar at the beginning of each year.”


World renown as the inventor of the Thruster style surfboard (three fins), Simon Anderson thoroughly enjoyed himself, and when asked what were his highlights from the weekend he replied, “The surfing here at Uluwatu was the highlight of the weekend for me…I was hoping to get one good wave today, which I did this year, so I’m pretty stoked. I’m traveling with my wife this trip and she enjoyed the turtle release where the Bali Beach Clean Up program has now released more than 140,000 turtles back to the sea.”



Photos by Tim Hain and Josh Symon


What comes to mind when you think of Bali?For most, the answer sounds something like this: amazing waves, warm water, wild nights and an ice-cold Bintang always within an arm’s reach. It sure can feel like paradise


Each year, we host The Annual Big Bali Eco Weekend to raise awareness for the cause and celebrate the efforts of those working hard to correct the island’s environmental issues.


As part of our commitment to keeping Bali clean, we have supported the breeding of sea turtles at Kuta Beach since 2007. In that time, we have released over 140,000 sea turtles back into the ocean. The 2017 Big Bali Eco Weekend gives you a chance to get involved and bump that number up even higher. To get involved, get down to Kuta Beach on Saturday the 29th of July. The beach clean up will be at 4pm followed by the Sea Turtle release at 5pm.


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What about the part where you actually get to go surfing? Yeah, just here.



Part of the weekend includes a surf contest, which means you get to paddle out at Uluwatu...with only 4 guys out. There are 40 spots on a first-come, first served basis. Just get there early on the morning of July 30th.


This year, Quiksilver and Coca-Cola Amatil Indonesia will work closely with Uluwatu based NGO, Project Clean Uluwatu (PCU) and the local Uluwatu Boardriders to raise funds that will go towards new infrastructure at Uluwatu that will keep the world class wave clean and pristine for generations to come.


The lucky 40+ surfers will get to paddle out and compete with Quiksilver legends including Mark Richards, Matt Hoy, Tom Carroll and Simon Anderson. Joining the international legends will be Bali legends that include Made Kasim, Ketut Menda, Made Switra, Made Lana, Tipi Jabrik, Dede Suryana and Rizal Tanjung for a total of 54 participants.


Need we say more? Here are some photos from last year... This could be yours for about $150 US



To register for the Quiksilver Uluwatu Challenge event, please send your name and contact information via email to quiksilver.challenge@quiksilver.co.id.


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See you at Racetracks!


The world needs more attitude. More fang. More character. More grit. More...MONGREL!

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All images by Ryan Heywood

The Quiksilver Uluwatu Challenge wrapped up yesterday and despite the drop in swell, the finalists gave it everything they got. And so did our legends Tom Carroll and Matt Hoy alongside some of our ROXY team riders in the hour-long expression session. Tom and Matt headed towards Temples to pick off the best waves coming through and the ROXY girls made the most of uncrowded Ulus.




After the expression session finalists Australian Jared Hilla and Brazilian Jean de Silva battled it out with Jared utilising his forehand attack and scoring an 8.00 to secure the win. As the sunset Matt Hoy and Mark Richards took to the stage at Single Fin to present Jared the trophy - and then the Sunday session was taken up a notch.






To get lost (then find themselves), some crew go surfing, some go travelling. In Hoyo’s case, he arrived in Bali, watched the sunset, drank some beers, then got lost in a rice field.

Triumphing over adversity, the next day Hoyo paddled out into 10 to 12 foot Uluwatu and got absolutely smashed.

Nice intro to Bali.

That was in 1990 and Hoyo has been coming back once or twice a year ever since.

If you’re Australian, you’ve probably done the same, but if you’re crossing time zones, there’s nothing like a few tips from an intrepid trouble-maker to get you started.

On a recent trip to Ulus, we sat down over Bintangs and asked Hoyo for his top 10 Indo travel tips.


1. Go straight to Ulus and watch the sunset (get it over with – ha! Nah, seriously, sunsets are the best)
2. Go and hang on the beach at Padma and have a beer – don’t go to a bar or stay in your hotel
3. Meet the local people
4. Drink Bintang
5. Don’t drink spirits (they’re not good for you over here – some can even be lethal)
6. Don’t do street drugs (a friend of a friend told me…)
7. Embrace the culture – the Balinese are amazing people
8. Don’t haggle too much – just pay the price because you’re going to pay next to nothing anyway
9. Eat off the street carts if you want to be experimental (with your guts)
10. Bring every board – from a fun little wave 5’10” board to an outside corner 7” and everything in-between. Boards break – the waves are a lot more powerful than you think.


‘If there’s no waves – drink, have a good time, hang out with the locals and watch the sunset.’

What happens after dark, that’s up to you.


As for surfing, hire a local boat charter to escape the crowded beach breaks and you’ll still be back in time for sunset beers at Kuta, Padma, Echo Beach, Canggu, wherever suits your vibe. Made Switra – local surfing legend and damn fine fisherman – knows exactly what wave you need. We asked Made the essentials.



When did you start your charter business?

Well, I’ve always been a fisherman and a surfer so starting my own boat charter business was the obvious thing to do. I wanted to share with everyone how much fun I was having with my friends on the boat. That was 18 years ago.


When’s the best time of year to go surfing?

Surfing is good all year, some waves will be smaller than others but there’s still waves. September to November is good for fishing. Before deciding where to go I’ll ask my fishermen friends and if there’s no fishing, I’ll go surfing.



What’s a day out on the boat with you involve?

We’ll start at 7am and surf twice for about six hours in total. We could head out to Kuta Reef or Airport Rights. Or we’ll go to Uluwatu and go down the whole west side to Yang Yang or 46, depending on the wind. People say that 46 is like Off the Wall in Hawaii when it’s four foot. It’s a fun wave and not too many people around.
If we go fishing and get a catch we can make a barbecue or have some sashimi on the beach.
The boat is pretty small so there’s room to bring drinks and boards for five people if we want to surf, or fishing for three.



How many day trips can someone hire you for?

I can take you on trips as many days as you like! I love taking people to less crowded spots and when the tide is changing I like to get them back on the boat and take off somewhere else.


If everyone is after the same kind of waves and they’re all travelling alone, I can take a bunch of people out that don’t know each other. Of course, it only works if everyone wants to surf the same size waves.



What’s your tip for someone who hasn’t been on a boat day trip before?

Bring some snacks to eat as you’ll be hungry during your six hour surf. You’ll need energy to get back in for your second surf. But if we surf Ulus and the waves aren’t too big, we'll go to Padang beach and you can swim in and grab something to eat or grab some beers.


So who chooses where we go surf?

I check Kuta beach every morning and I’ll know how big Ulus will be, how big Bingin will be and when the best time will be to go.
I know when it’s the best for every spot so I’ll let you know where I think we should go and then it’s up to you choose.

Hit up Made Switra here if you want to book a trip.


Follow Matt Hoy and Quiksilver




Nearly every surfer who visits Bali falls in love with the place – the waves, the culture, the food, the people, the sunsets, the good times. What’s not to love?

But over the years Bali has started to deal with a trash problem – and it’s not going away. For four months of every year during the wet season Bali’s beaches are full of rubbish. It sucks. So Quiksilver partnered with Coca-Cola Amatil and Garuda Indonesia and decided to do something about it. Since 2008, 75 local workers have been cleaning six miles of beach from Kuta to Jimbaran every single day – that’s 13,000 dump trucks of rubbish and counting.

Each year to raise awareness – and surf – we host Bali’s Big Eco Weekend. Last Saturday, our legends and team riders headed to Legian for a beach clean-up, release 1,000 freshly hatched sea turtles back into the ocean and to share the stoke with the local groms and tourists. To wrap up the day – and prepare for the Uluwatu Challenge – a Balinese Hindu priest welcomed the good spirits with a blessing on the beach of the team riders and legends at sunset.

Photos: Jason Childs.
The gods were smiling on Sunday as glassy sets rolled into Uluwatu. Surfing six person heats, our team riders sat in the line-up with frothing surfers whose entry fee pays to keep the clean-up project going. Everyone was stoked. Among the crew was a 16 year old from Barbados, expats, Uluwatu locals, and the Quiksilver work experience kid from the Bali office. They took turns to get barreled (or go over the falls trying) with team riders and legends. Freddy P, Matt Hoy, Craig Anderson, Jake Paterson, Mark Richards, Rosy Hodge, Bruna Schmitz and Kelia Moniz were in the water. Plus the local crew Dede Suryana, Tipi Jabrik, Rio Waida. Not a bad line-up.


Balinese Hindu offerings / Photo: Tim Hain

As the clean five foot sets rolled in, Kelia Moniz nose rode on one wave as Jake Paterson threw buckets on the wave behind. The guys hooted the girls, the girls hooted the guys. Everyone was super stoked. Freddy P scored a perfect 10, winning the comp.

At sunset, Bintangs were clinked, the music was cranked and Hoyo jumped up on stage to bang out some AC/DC at Single Fin. Epic. Make sure you’re there next year.


Photos: Jason Childs.
Mark Richards / Photo: Ryan Heywood
Craig Anderson & Kelia Moniz / Photo: Ryan Heywood

Rio Waida / Photo: Jason Childs


Jake Paterson / Photo: Jason Childs

Kelia Moniz / Photo: Jason Childs
Craig Anderson / Photo: Jason Childs
Photo: Tim Hain
Rosy Hodge & frothing local Billy Hangan / Photo: Jason Childs
Matt Hoy / Photo: Jason Childs
Mark Richards / Photo: Jason Childs
Jake Paterson / Photo: Tim Hain
Kelia Moniz and Bruna Schmitz / Photo: Jason Childs
Freddy P / Photo: Jason Childs
Rosy Hodge / Photo: Tim Hain


Have you ever wanted to surf Uluwatu uncrowded? Yep, so have we.

Have you ever wanted to surf with legends like Mark Richards, Matt Hoy or Jake Paterson? Or how about Craig Anderson or Freddy P? Or local Bali legends Made Kasim, Ketut Menda, and Made Lana and Quiksilver team riders Tipi Jabrik and Dede Suryana? Yep, so have we.

This Sunday 22 June, 32 lucky surfers will paddle out and compete with these legends and team riders to raise money for environmental and beach clean-up programs in Bali.

Our clean-up program employs a crew of 74 who collect rubbish every day from the Kuta, Kedonganan, Jimbaran, Seminyak, and Legian beaches. Since 2008, over 24 million tons of rubbish has been collected. Yep, that's truckloads.

HOW TO REGISTER FOR THE ULUWATU CHALLENGE:
Email nadia.masrunon@asiansurfingtour.com with your contact details. All entries are on a first come, first served basis. The entry fee is Rp. 2 million (about $180 USD) entry fee - and proceeds go to beach clean-up programs in Bali.

Successful applicants will be notified and expected to attend the opening party at the Boardriders Café on Jalan Legian in Kuta starting at 7:00pm on June 20, where they will pay an entry fee and view heat draws.

The event will run in an Eddie Aikau six-person heat format, where each surfer competes in two heats and the two highest scores from their four best waves will be scored and totaled. The surfer with the highest two-wave score total (out of a possible 20 points, maximum of 10 points per wave) will be declared the winner of the event.

“I travel all over the world and still rate Indo as my favorite…looking forward to getting on to some long lefts at Ulus!” says Craig Anderson.

After the competition the Single Fin bar will open up for a sunset party and host the awards presentation. Good times.

If you want to get more involved with Bali's Big Eco Weekend come down to Legian Beach all day Saturday for a community event - there's a beach clean-up and locals ripping in the Padma Challenge Surf Comp. Our legends and team riders crew will be sharing the stoke too. Come and get amongst it.

The Quiksilver Uluwatu Challenge is presented by Quiksilver, Coca-Cola Amatil Indonesia, Garuda Indonesia, Boardriders Café, Single Fin, Jim Beam, and San Miguel, with support by the Uluwatu Boardriders Club and the Asian Surfing Championships.

Photos by Jason Childs.

A common trend you’ll find in Novocastrian Matt Hoy’s mix is guitar jams. He likes his music the way he likes his surfing – fast and flowing, but jarring. And powerful. So, so powerful. This mix’ll blow your head off, then bring you straight back down to earth. Don’t waste another minute! Dive in!

Its all about NSW beachies at the moment, it's been pumping lately! Jesse Adam and Matt Hoy enjoying some fun waves over the last few weeks, inside and above the lip.

Photos: Jack Taylor